09 March 2018

This 'n' That

Well, it's coming. Daylight Savings Time (DST) arrives on Sunday. Yes, it's the time of year when folks show up late to church, or, if on time, are yawning with exhaustion from the loss of an hour of sleep. Nothing says "Happy Spring" like increases in heart attacks and car accidents.

I once lived in a place that did not observe DST (only part of the state opted not to change its clocks). At the time, it annoyed me simply because I didn't understand why that part of the state couldn't be "normal" like the rest of the country. Now, I miss it. Why? Because I have come to the conclusion that DST is not overly useful, particularly in this age of electricity. Let's face it, even if it is still light outside, I am probably going to turn on the lights in my office or family room so that I can be most effective at whatever task needs to be accomplished. Most of us who work do so in well-lit offices, even though the sun is up during our core hours, do we not?

In 2013, National Geographic reported on some of the studies that have been conducted to determine the benefit, if any, of DST.
Environmental economist Hendrik Wolff, of the University of Washington, and colleagues found that the practice did indeed drop lighting and electricity use in the evenings—but that higher energy demands during darker mornings completely canceled out the evening gains. [...]

In terms of energy savings, Downing said, Wolff's and other studies are no longer in much dispute: It's clear that DST doesn't save energy in the big picture.

Part of the story that is often ignored, he added, is the energy required to get people from place to place—gasoline. In fact the petroleum and automobile industries have always been huge supporters of DST, Downing said.

"When you give Americans more light at the end of the day, they really do want to get out of the house. And they go to ballparks, or to the mall and other places, but they don't walk there. Daylight saving reliably increases the amount of driving that Americans do, and gasoline consumption tracks up with daylight saving." (Source)
And for those of us who grew up thinking that DST was necessary for farmers, well, we were lied to (shocking, I know). According to the article cited above, farmers were a group most strongly opposed to the idea.

So, I will change my clocks tomorrow night, simply because it does no good to rebel against this particular system. Let it be known, though, that I am not thrilled about it. Also, a huge shoutout to smartphone designers for designing those clocks to change themselves. Otherwise, I most certainly would not awaken in time to get to church!

Okay, now that this week's grumbling-fest is over, before you take a pre-DST nap, why not take a few minutes to enjoy your week in review (kind of):
  • Indeed, sometimes this life really is a vale of tears. Praise God for the hope that is ours in Christ!
  • Women, on staff in a church? Gasp! In all seriousness, I really appreciate this article by Dr. Kruger.
  • The Lord is a King.
  • Some people may write this off as a waste of research, but, if used properly, this could be a valuable treatment.
  • Here is your weekly dose of adorable.
  • Secular research has concluded the following: people lie, and it is better to be honest.
  • I won't laugh at this because, if I were there, this would totally happen to me.
  • How beautiful! What an amazing Creator our God is!
  • Take this quiz and then check your answers.
Great is the power which Christ displays in building His Church! He carries on His work in spite of opposition from the world, the flesh, and the devil. [...] We ought to feel deeply thankful that the building of the true Church is laid on the shoulders of One that is mighty. If the work depended on man, it would soon stand still. But, blessed be God, the work is in the hands of a Builder who never fails to accomplish His designs! Christ is the almighty Builder. He will carry on His work, though nations and visible Churches may not know their duty. Christ will never fail. That which He has undertaken He will certainly accomplish. —J.C. Ryle

1 comment:

  1. I actually DID walk into a (very clean) glass pane at a public library years ago thinking it was the exit door- and it almost turned into one. Very thankfully, I neither broke the glass, or my head. But it was humbling experience. Needed I'm sure.


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