23 June 2017

This 'n' That

I am about to venture into dangerous territory. I am about to go where some of you may think I shouldn't. I am about to comment on parenting...even though I am not a parent.

It's true, I do not have children; however, I do have common sense. I do have a Bible, which tells me basic principles. And, let's face it, I also have an opinion.

Photo by Sebastian Molinares on Unsplash
Climbing. Climbing can be fun! We all loved climbing trees in our yard when we were young, didn't we? I know I did! That fun did not come without an element of required oversight for safety, though, and it was fun that took place on my parents' property.

Climbing can also be dangerous. When you climb someone else's property, it can be a liability. When you climb anything, safety must be strictly considered.

Yet, some parents today do not seem to understand this. Their kids can be seen climbing anything and everything, from their own counters, refrigerators, and walls, to store shelves and street lights. Yep, street lights.

I ran an errand the other day, and as I pulled into the parking lot, I saw two children taking turns climbing the base and pole of one of the lights in the parking lot. These kids weren't unattended, however; no, the mother was right there...helping and encouraging them. She gave them a boost when they needed a boost, and lifted them off when she decided it was time to go. It seemed careless and unwise, to say the least.

So there I sat, mouth agape, wondering just what would have happened if she had dropped one of those children in helping them down or if one of those kids had fallen on their own. Would the store have been sued for being so careless as to have lights in their parking lot? Chances are that such an accident would have been seen as anybody's fault except the parent.

It's the way of the world, isn't it? Parents are so busy being "cool" and being friends with their kids that they fail to perform their actual job—a most important job—parenting. It may be difficult to believe, but it is possible to be a fun parent while still being a parent. It is possible to show love to your children, even when telling them no, and even when disciplining them.
My son, do not reject the discipline of the LORD
Or loathe His reproof,
For whom the LORD loves He reproves,
Even as a father corrects the son in whom he delights. 
(Proverbs 3:11-12; cf. Hebrews 12:7-11)
Parents, don't neglect the incredible duty and honor of being a parent. Someday, your children will be grown and, by God's grace, they will then be your friend. While you are responsible for their growth, nurturing, and well-being, though, you need to be their parent, watching out for their physical needs and protection. This might mean not allowing them to climb lampposts in parking lots, and telling them "no" might lead to a tantrum. That's okay, because, in case you forgot...you're the parent. If you cannot be trusted with their physical protection, how can you hope to cultivate their spiritual growth?

Okay, I'm done speaking out of turn now. If you're still reading, I hope you'll enjoy your week in review (kind of):
  • Good news, this is not Rosemary's baby.
  • Here's an interesting snapshot of occupations in the Bible (HT: Elizabeth Prata).
  • It's hard to ignore Augustine when you're talking about grace.
  • The discussion surrounding the idea of the eternal subordination of the Son (ESS) is still ongoing.
  • Um, this is weird, right?
  • Waiting on God? Be mindful not to be impatient.
  • Here's your weekly dose of adorable (local friends, she is available for adoption!).
  • Lysa Terkeurst is a dangerous teacher, and ladies would do well to steer clear of her in this regard. Terkeurst also recently announced that she is pursuing a divorce from her husband. Her stated reasons are biblical and, even as we avoid her as a "Bible" teacher, we should still nevertheless pray for her and not take joy in her sorrow.
  • So what you're saying is, "Ken" will now never be fictionally married to "Barbie" because, let's face it, who is going to marry a guy sporting a man-bun?
  • There have been some recent updates to the James Macdonald/Harvest Bible Chapel saga.
  • I had never heard of verse mapping before. Thanks for warning us, Michelle!
  • Sigh. Does this really exist?
  • This is a helpful overview of multiple sclerosis.
  • I don't actually know what a fidget spinner is, but I'm pretty sure it's not something we need to aid us in teaching biblical doctrine.
  • "Rather than giving them [internet polemicists] the attention they crave, I urge you to step out of their audience and to pray for them to humble themselves and allow godly leaders to come alongside them and disciple them not just in doctrine, but in Christian love as well." Amen
  • I'm still in the process of listening to this sermon by Martyn Lloyd-Jones on the glory of the cross:

3 comments:

  1. Thanks for these. The subordination link is a repeat of the earthpix one (i.e., and not related to subordination I think!)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oops! Good catch, Anonymous, thank you! The link should be fixed now.

      Delete
  2. Thanks for you astute article about our responsibilities!! When a parent is void of (or rejects) Biblical truth and its instruction, their children will "act-out" in the same or similar manner as the parent's belief-system of "it's my right to and I want to, everyone else does it, or I'm not hurting anything/anyone."

    When there is no concept, knowledge or acceptance of the obvious and marked differences between "right and wrong," the parent and children see no error in pursuing their personal wants and desires, no matter who is at risk physically, civically or spiritually.

    ReplyDelete

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