07 May 2017

When We Forget the Meaning of Grace

Without a continual reminder of the good news of the gospel, we can easily fall into one of two errors. The first is to focus on our external performance and become proud like the Pharisees. We may then begin to look down our spiritual noses at others who are not as disciplined, obedient, and committed as we are and in a very subtle way begin to feel spiritually superior to them.

The second error is the exact opposite of the first. It is the feeling of guilt. We have been exposed to the disciplines of the Christian life, to obedience, and to service, and in our hearts we have responded to those challenges. We haven't, however, been as successful as others around us appear to be. Or we find ourselves dealing with some of the sins of the heart such as anger, resentment, covetousness, and a judgmental attitude....Because we have put the gospel on the shelf as far as our own lives are concerned, we struggle with a sense of failure and guilt. We believe God is displeased with us, and we certainly wouldn't expect His blessing on our lives. After all, we don't deserve His favor.

Because we are focusing on our performance, we forget the meaning of grace: God's unmerited favor to those who deserve only His wrath. Pharisee-type believers unconsciously think they have earned God's blessing through their behavior. Guilt-laden believers are quite sure they have forfeited God's blessing through their lack of discipline or their disobedience. Both have forgotten the meaning of grace because they have moved away from the gospel and have slipped into a performance relationship with God.

—Jerry Bridges, The Discipline of Grace: God's Role and Our Role in the Pursuit of Holiness, (NavPress: 2006), 22-23.

Further Reading
Faith Makes Christ Precious
Equipping Eve: On Choosing the Good Part
The Cross and the World

2 comments:

  1. I took that lily pad shot! So psyched that you found it. But even better than that, is the consistent high quality of all your posts! Keep it up!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is an amazing photograph, Peter! Thanks for putting it out on the Internet so the rest of us can enjoy it!

      Delete

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