31 March 2017

This 'n' That

It's hard to believe that it is already the end of March! That means that tomorrow is April Fool's Day, or at least it is for those who celebrate it.

I never understood the point of April Fool's Day. I mean, I understand it, I just don't understand why some people think it's a worthwhile use of their time, energy, and brain power in such a way. Although, perhaps my aversion to this day is actually due to the fact that my brother pulled some pretty good pranks on me when we were younger. It's fine, though. Someday maybe I'll get him back!
Yeah, I don't get it either.

Considering the origins of April Fool's Day remain a bit of a mystery, I suspect that many others out there share my sentiments about this bizarre and pointless day. Nevertheless, as long as it's all in good fun, a little levity is healthy for us, right?

What strikes me is how many people treat the resurrection of the Lord Jesus Christ as no more than a predated April Fool's joke. From the swoon theory, to the claim that His disciples stole Christ's body (Matthew 28:11-15), sinful men have long tried to convince one another that Jesus didn't die on the cross or, if He did, that He did not rise 3 days later. Thankfully, we Christians know this is not the case, for God's inerrant Word tells us exactly what happened:
But on the first day of the week, at early dawn, they came to the tomb bringing the spices which they had prepared. And they found the stone rolled away from the tomb, but when they entered, they did not find the body of the Lord Jesus. While they were perplexed about this, behold, two men suddenly stood near them in dazzling clothing; and as the women were terrified and bowed their faces to the ground, the men said to them, “Why do you seek the living One among the dead? He is not here, but He has risen. Remember how He spoke to you while He was still in Galilee, saying that the Son of Man must be delivered into the hands of sinful men, and be crucified, and the third day rise again.” And they remembered His words, and returned from the tomb and reported all these things to the eleven and to all the rest. Now they were Mary Magdalene and Joanna and Mary the mother of James; also the other women with them were telling these things to the apostles. But these words appeared to them as nonsense, and they would not believe them. But Peter got up and ran to the tomb; stooping and looking in, he saw the linen wrappings only; and he went away to his home, marveling at what had happened. 
(Luke 24:1-12)
Aren't we thankful that we can know without question that Christ not only died on the cross, serving as a substitute and bearing the wrath of God for all who would ever believe, but that we can also know that He rose three days later, demonstrating God's acceptance of His sacrifice (Hebrews 10:11-14)? Faith may be the conviction of things not seen, but it is also the assurance of things hoped for (Hebrews 11:1). We know our faith is not in vain, because the truth of what we must believe is sufficiently contained within the Bible, that Word that God has been so gracious to give to us (John 20:31).

Well, that was a long and windy introduction, wasn't it? Oh well, I suppose we're all entitled to wax eloquent now and then! Now that I'm done, I hope you'll stick around and enjoy your week in review (kind of):
  • I disagree with Challies' first sentence here, but agree with his points.
  • This is a little bit disgusting, but so good to see that little kitten get help!
  • Salvation is a work of the Trinity.
  • I always knew the Pope was a bad Catholic.
  • Here's your weekly dose of adorable (HT to Lori!).
  • In case you're looking for Kevin DeYoung.
  • God didn't need to create such a colorful world, but we are thankful He did!
  • I am thankful for unknown, but faithful pastors.
  • Steve Kreloff teaches on the four names of Christ in Isaiah 9:6-7:

1 comment:

  1. Regarding hymnals, I agree with many of the points. I love singing in harmony and over the years have learned to do it without seeing the musical notes. I'm hoping to teach my grandchildren how to read some music via hymns and teach them harmonies. It just makes worship so much fuller and richer, in my opinion.

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