16 November 2016

Consequences of the Cross: Glorification


When Christ said upon the cross, “It is finished,” He declared His redemptive work to be complete. His perfect sacrifice had pleased and appeased the Father and ransomed His people.

All those who would ever be in Christ now stand legally justified before the Father, cloaked in the righteousness of the Son.

Christ’s sheep now not only follow Him, they are sanctified and set apart, growing to look more like their Shepherd each day, even in the midst of a hostile world.

That would be enough undeserved blessing, but at the cross Christ accomplished even more.
For this perishable must put on the imperishable, and this mortal must put on immortality. (1 Corinthians 15:53)
The consequences of the cross did not end with Christ’s final breath. His subsequent resurrection assured a future resurrection and eternal life in glory for all believers.

Glorification is a final, future work wherein God will transform our broken, physical bodies into eternal bodies fit to enjoy eternity (1 Corinthians 14:12-19; 15:42-44; 1 Corinthians 15:51-52).

This future work will be the ultimate culmination of our ongoing sanctification and the final removal of our sin (Romans 8:18).

The promise of glorification is why we look for the return of our Lord Jesus Christ, who alone is our blessed hope.
[L]ooking for the blessed hope and the appearing of the glory of our great God and Savior, Christ Jesus…(Titus 2:13)
In this moment, we will be “set free from slavery to corruption” (Romans 8:21), will instantly be conformed to the image of our Savior, and, best of all, will see our Lord face to face.
For now we see in a mirror dimly, but then face to face…(1 Corinthians 13:12)
We know that when He appears, we will be like Him, because we will see Him just as He is. (1 John 3:2b)
Christian, is there any greater promise? May we seek to serve Christ well while we await His return.

See Also:
Consequences of the Cross
Consequences of the Cross: Redemption
Consequences of the Cross: Propitiation
Consequences of the Cross: Justification
Consequences of the Cross: Reconciliation
Consequences of the Cross: Sanctification

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