12 October 2016

Consequences of the Cross: Redemption



Most of us know what it is to pay a ransom, though few of us have actually been required to do so! A ransom may be defined as a payment made for the release of a prisoner.

In Mark 10:45, Jesus declared, “For even the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give His life a ransom for many.” At the cross, Jesus Christ paid the ransom for those who are His.

Scripture speaks of Christ paying this ransom in another term, namely, “redemption.”

Colossians 1:14 says Christ rescued us “from the domain of darkness” and teaches that it is in Him that, “we have redemption, the forgiveness of sins.”

Peter reminds us that we were redeemed “with precious blood, as of a lamb unblemished and spotless, the blood of Christ” (1 Peter 1:19).

Hebrews 9:12 tells us that Christ obtained “eternal redemption” for His own.

Redeemed.

Redeemed from what? From sin and slavery to sin. All men stand guilty before God, unable to obtain their own righteousness (Romans 3:10-18, 23) and the wages of sin is death (Romans 6:23).

Redeemed by what? By the blood of Christ, of whom John the Baptist proclaimed, “Behold, the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world!” (John 1:29). It is only by the shedding of blood that sins are forgiven (Hebrews 9:22) and “it is impossible for the blood of bulls and goats to take away sins” (Hebrews 10:4).

Why were we redeemed? It pleased God to set apart a people for Himself. As the spotless Lamb, Jesus Christ, bled and died, He did so for the sake of those who had been given to Him by the Father (John 10:11, 15, 17, 18; 1 Peter 1:20-21).

Christian, do you thank God for the redemption that was obtained for you at the cross?

Have you praised Christ for paying the ransom price that freed you from your bondage to sin?

See Also:
Consequences of the Cross

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