26 October 2016

Consequences of the Cross: Justification


Christ’s work on the cross is everything for the Christian. It must be.

It was essential that Jesus live in perfect obedience to the Law (Matthew 5:17).

Without the resurrection, our faith would be in vain (1 Corinthians 15:13-19).

Yet it is Christ’s work at Calvary that brought about justification (Romans 5:9). It was the pleasing nature of His substitutionary, atoning sacrifice before the Father that paid the ransom price for men’s sinful souls.

Justification is a one-time event. Upon receiving salvation, where once a man stood guilty and condemned before the holy God, he now stands justified and is reckoned as righteous before the Father (Romans 5:1).

Justification is wholly a divine work. It is God who justifies (Romans 8:30, 33) and men are justified as the righteousness of Christ is imputed to them.
He made Him who knew no sin to be sin on our behalf, so that we might become the righteousness of God in Him. (2 Corinthians 5:21)
Justification is a gift from God that is granted to believers and is made theirs by faith (Romans 3:24).

No work of the Law can render men righteous before God, only faith in the Lord Jesus Christ.

This truth is repeatedly stated in Scripture. Paul declares it boldly in Galatians 3:24-26:
Therefore the Law has become our tutor to lead us to Christ, so that we may be justified by faith. But now that faith has come, we are no longer under a tutor. For you are all sons of God through faith in Christ Jesus.
Yet even this faith is a gift from God to men.
For by grace you have been saved through faith; and that not of yourselves, it is the gift of God; not as a result of works, so that no one may boast. (Ephesians 2:8-9)
Saints on both sides of the cross are justified by faith in Christ alone (Romans 4:3; cf. Hebrews 11).

Have you placed your faith in this great Savior?

See Also:
Consequences of the Cross
Consequences of the Cross: Redemption
Consequences of the Cross: Propitiation

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