21 October 2011

The Answer to All Life's Squabbles? The T.D. Jakes Relationship Bible

There's another new Bible in town. The Relationship Bible. No, allow me to correct that: The T.D. Jakes Relationship Bible.

Some choice excerpts from the product description at Amazon read as follows (all emphases mine):
Throughout our lives, we all face a long list of questions on relationships that trouble our souls and require real answers based on real truth. How do I forgive someone who has hurt me badly? Can I mend this broken relationship? When my world seems to be falling apart around me, who can I trust and in whom dare I confide? How do I know whether a person is the right one to date? Will my marriage survive? How do I nourish my child’s heart? What do I do with my fears about expressing my love and care to a friend?
The good news is that in God’s Word we find the answers to life’s bewildering relationship questions. (Online Source)
Really? Is that why God provided the Bible for us, to answer "life's bewildering relationship questions?"
All Scripture is breathed out by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness, that the man of God may be complete, equipped for every good work. (2 Timothy 3:16)
Hm. Well, maybe Paul had it wrong.
From Genesis to Revelation, it is clear that the Holy Bible is, in the words of Bishop T.D. Jakes, “The Greatest Love Story Ever Told.” It is not a book about religion, but relationships—from the creation of a man and a woman and their intimate relationship with God in the Garden through the tragic break in that relationship at the Fall and the eventual restoration of that relationship through Jesus Christ and His death on the cross of Calvary. (Online Source)
First of all, maybe this is just personal preference, but I'd really rather not think of Jesus like my big cosmic boyfriend. It's not biblical, it's irreverent and, it's also a tad creepy.

As for the last statement, yes, the shed blood of Christ, His perfect atoning sacrifice was the means by which men can be saved. However, there is no restored relationship for those who do not repent and put their faith in Jesus Christ. The wording above seems to imply otherwise.

Here's about the only thing in the product description that I can agree with:
Our relationship with God is the foundation for our lives. (Online Source)
Can't really argue with that, except for one thing. Thus far in his ministry, T.D. Jakes has given little indication that he worships the true God of the Bible. As a Word-Faith prosperity preacher, Jakes teaches a false gospel. If he indeed holds to the doctrine of the Oneness Pentecostals as regards the Trinity (i.e., modalism, and thus far he has given no indication otherwise), Jakes then worships a false god. So one must wonder, which God is he really talking about here?

This week, Jakes held his annual Woman, Thou Art Loosed conference, wherein he welcomed fellow Word-Faith pastrixes to come and teach fleece an excruciatingly large flock. What a grievous and abominable thing to think that the teachings of this man will be resting alongside God's holy Word in this newest Bible.

Of course, I have no issues whatsoever with using a good study Bible. Personally, I've benefitted greatly from resources such as the MacArthur Study Bible, the ESV Study Bible and the HCSB Study Bible, among others. But this is no study Bible. Commentary on the text is one thing. Articles and stories about earthly relationships are quite another. Why must this material be contained within the pages of a Bible? Why must we continue to make God's Word more "relevant" and more "accessible" by creating a new gimmicky Bible for every felt need and hobby that comes along? It seems it's more and more difficult these days to walk into a "Christian" bookstore and find just a plain, old "boring" Bible sitting on the shelf. How terribly sad!

I hate to break it to "Bishop" Jakes, but God's Word doesn't need his relationship advice. Perhaps it would be helpful if instead the bishop opened the Bible and studied up on one of the most important relationships revealed by Scripture: that between God the Father, God the Son and God the Holy Spirit.

SEE ALSO:
T.D. Jakes and the Trinity (from Apprising Ministries)

4 comments:

  1. Love my MacArthur Study Bible! Someone tweeted yesterday, "God is madly in love with you". Ewww. Unfollowed!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Unfollow indeed! That's just icky. And it's bad theology.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Just out of curiosity, did you actually read The Relationship Bible, or just online commentary about it? My understanding was that it wasn't the relationship advice of Bishop Jakes, but more of a resource to address many of the relationship concerns of most people. Kind of a point in the right direction when you have concerns about your relationships with people. And, I'm sorry, but I happen to be falling madly in love with Jesus right now. And I feel it's the most pure and real relationship I will ever have. I think that the person who reads or hears that and makes a sexual connection is the person with the problem.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Anonymous,

    "Bishop" Jakes is the one who teaches an inappropriate connection with Christ. He has said in a DVD teaching:

    "When Jesus says, ‘Take, eat. This is my body that was broken for you,’ He says, I want my body in you. (Pause . . . shouts and claps) I want my blood in you. And every time you celebrate this rite, it is a reminder that you belong to me, and I belong to you. And he said, ‘I will drink no more wine until I drink it new with you and the kingdom of God. Communion is the most romantic ordinance. Eh, Eh, Eh. (He laughs. Pause . . . the audience shouts and claps.) It is the most romantic ordinance between two lovers."

    This article will explain in detail and from Scripture why his comments are grossly inappropriate: http://guardinghisflock.com/2010/03/04/eroticizing-the-eucharist-1/

    And just a note, per my comment policy, comments will no longer be published on this article since it is well over one month old.

    ReplyDelete

Please keep it pithy (in other words, if your comment is long enough to be its own blog post, don't bother), pertinent (please don't go off-topic), and respectful (to the author, to the other readers, and to the subject of the post). If you can't do that, your comment will not be posted.

If you haven't already, please read the Comment Policy in its entirety.